Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

Adventures in Babysitting 30th Anniversary Screening

My friend Marco and I attended a 30th anniversary screening of Adventures in Babysitting (1987) at the Castro Theatre yesterday. Keith Coogan (Brad) was the special guest, and he did a Q&A after the film. He and his wife Pinky had a table set up in the lobby where they met fans, posed for photos, and sold some merchandise.

Marco and I arrived at the Castro early, so we had some pizza slices and then wandered around the neighborhood. One of the art galleries had a portrait of Gilbert Baker in their window. He designed the Gay Pride rainbow flag, and he sadly passed away earlier this week. We bumped into Keith Coogan and Pinky outside a taqueria, so we introduced ourselves and chatted for a few minutes. They recognized my twitter name and were good-humored and friendly.

Once we got in the cinema, I enjoyed watching Coogan and his wife interact with fans before the film. Marco got popcorn and relaxed in our seats. There weren’t a lot of us at the screening, but the line at the Coogans’ table was steady and everybody was having a good time. There was a good spread of ages, too, although I didn’t see any kids.

During the Q&A, Coogan talked about the audition and rehearsal process, his lasting friendship with Anthony Rapp, filming in Toronto, the film’s journey from script to screen, cast parties, real life crushes, the AIB remake, and his current projects. He told us an early version of the AIB script had Sarah swap her toy chest for one carrying plutonium, which evolved into the backpack with the Playboy magazine.

Anthony Rapp tweeted earlier this week about the screening:

I got to meet Rapp in 2006 when he was on tour for his memoir Without You, at both The Booksmith and at his Swedish-American Hall performance.

Adventures in Babysitting holds up well after 30 years. This was my first time seeing it in the cinema. Marco and I reminisced on the drive home about what we were doing in 1987, trying to remember the movies we saw on the big screen that year. It was a good year for films, and in these uncertain times, it’s a good year to escape back into, for a few hours on a Saturday afternoon.

Thank you, SF Sketchfest, the Castro Theatre, and Keith Coogan! You’re lovely, Pinky!

When We Rise: The San Francisco Premiere

As a volunteer with GLAAD, I received an invitation to attend the February 20th premiere of When We Rise, Dustin Lance Black’s new ABC miniseries chronicling the LGBTQ rights movement, focusing on the lives of several San Francisco activists. I invited a friend as my plus one and submitted my RSVP, although I wasn’t sure about an 8 hour marathon or the “first come first served” seating. Then my friend got sick, and the day arrived with heavy rain and 60 mph winds expected by the evening. Still, I braved the elements alone and headed to the Castro Theatre.

When I arrived in the Castro at 1pm, the doors to the cinema had just opened. At first I got into the wrong line, where the production folks were checking in. One of the young actors turned around and was very helpful pointing out the right line. I wasn’t sure any of the cast would be there, so this was a happy omen. My line went down the block and just around the corner of 18th Street. After I got there, many more folks arrived behind me. A friendly young woman with an ABC7 cap came by to explain what to expect. She assured us we’d all get in at that point in the line. We’d be checked in and given wristbands, which would allow us to come and go during the breaks. Everyone attending would also get a ticket for a free drink and a bag of popcorn.

I chatted with the guys around me, and there was some confusion about how much of the miniseries would be shown. Dustin Lance Black tweeted that we’d watch the whole 8 hours, but the numbering of the episodes is confusing. IMDb says there are 8 episodes, Wikipedia says 7 parts, but it’s being shown on 4 nights. Anyway, the ABC7 woman assured us we’d be seeing the entire miniseries, in four segments, with two 15 minute breaks and one 2 hour dinner break. The program would start at 2pm and end around 11:30pm.

There were still plenty of seats on the ground floor when I got in, but I headed to the balcony for a front row seat above. You don’t get a crick in your neck looking up at the screen there. Since we’d be spending a lot of time together, I introduced myself to several of the folks in my section. The young guy behind me worked as an extra in several scenes, so it was fun to hear to his stories.

Dustin Lance Black went up onstage with a microphone to introduce the first segment, saying that many of the activists depicted in the series were in the audience. He also pointed out that without the commercials, each segment was shorter than two hours. Zeke Stokes of GLAAD also spoke, and later in the day Roma Guy, Cecilia Chung, and Cleve Jones got up onstage to address the audience. We also had a song performed by the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus.

During the screening, the audience cheered a lot—when familiar names were said, when well-known landmarks were shown, and when serious truths were spoken. The SF Chronicle says we booed the villains, but I only heard hissing.

Because When We Rise doesn’t air on ABC until next week (February 27th, then March 1st-3rd), I can’t share much about it yet. I never give plot spoilers anyway. I will say that the lesser-known young actors are terrific. These include Jonathan Majors, Adam DiMarco, Rafael De La Fuente, Fiona Dourif, Nick Eversman, Kevin McHale (familiar from Glee) and so many more. Austin P. McKenzie as the younger Cleve Jones had my heart from his first moments onscreen. I also really connected emotionally with Emily Skeggs as the younger Roma Guy. This kind of connection is crucial if the viewer is going to stick with these characters through a miniseries. I can’t count the number of shows I’ve seen where I appreciated the quality but didn’t care enough about any one character to keep watching.

During our first break, I met Emily Skeggs. It’s great to watch someone onscreen for the first time (whether it’s their first time or just yours), and then be able to tell them right away how much their performance has touched you. This is one of the reasons Twitter is so addictive, but doing it in person is so much more satisfying. I’m certain that many more viewers like me will be looking up these young actors and following them on social media. I was already doing that at the dinner break.

A tip for those folks looking at the cast lists online—at this point, the IMDb page is incomplete. Kevin McHale and Rafael de la Fuente, for example, are not yet listed. Wikipedia includes them and several other actors not listed on IMDb, but it’s not complete either.

At the end of the screening, all the folks involved with the production went up onstage. I left the balcony and came down to the front in time to video a bit of the song Oh Happy Day, and then it was done. I said hello to Dustin Lance Black and Tom Daley, then met Austin P. McKenzie and Kevin McHale (such a charmer, that one!).

I came out of the theatre to find that the rain had stopped, but the wind was blowing hard. I rode the bus home with a couple of fellow viewers, and we talked about our impressions of the miniseries. I got home tired but still wired from the experience.

I’m looking forward to watching When We Rise again next week. It will be interesting to compare the difference seeing it on a small screen, without an audience, and with the ad breaks.

This miniseries will hopefully inspire viewers to read more about the activists and the history of this struggle for equality, understanding, and respect. There’s so much more to learn. The book When We Rise: My Life in the Movement by Cleve Jones is a good place to start.

Thank you to Dustin Lance Black and everyone involved for making this miniseries. Thank you to GLAAD and ABC for the privilege of attending this amazing event.

http://www.sfchronicle.com/tv/article/LGBT-community-sees-its-story-told-in-When-We-10948675.php

https://ripplenews.com/watch/san-francisco/when-we-rise-shows-emotional-powerful-san-francisco-lgbt-movement-1s7r0o5h (This is a video of the premiere from local ABC7 news.)

http://www.sfchronicle.com/tv/article/When-We-Rise-a-story-of-past-struggle-and-a-10954771.php

Tom Daley’s video of the premiere:

San Francisco Women’s March

I just got home from the Women’s March in San Francisco. What an amazing experience! It was so hard waiting for our march when most of the others across the US happened in the morning. Ours started at 3pm with a rally at Civic Center, with the march down Market Street to the Embarcadero starting at 5pm. It didn’t quite happen that way—I ended up behind the stage, where we couldn’t see or hear, so a lot of us started down Market Street somewhat early. It rained most of the time, but nobody seemed to mind.

I didn’t see any violence or misbehavior. The mood was friendly and sometimes boisterous. I enjoyed seeing the men, children and dogs who joined in.

A big thank you to Summer, Emily and Alex, who ‘adopted’ me for the march. You’re awesome!

 

 

Happy Birthday, Chad Lowe

A week before Thanksgiving I had to go to the emergency room. The nurse practitioner resembled Chad Lowe, bringing back memories of  Life Goes On and the encounter I had with Lowe here in San Francisco. Once I felt better, I checked IMDb to see what Lowe has been doing lately, and now I follow him on twitter and Instagram. Since January 15th is his birthday, I’m sharing some wallpapers of his many roles—and looks—through the years.

The 80s

I remember watching Chad Lowe first in April Morning (1988), which aired a few days before I moved to England. It’s a TV movie about the first day of the American Revolutionary War. I was already a Rob Lowe fan, so I was curious about younger brother Chad. I remember being impressed by his performance. I wish I’d seen more of his early work, because some of it is now impossible to find.

1984-1989

The roles above are from Flight 90: Disaster on the Potomac, Silence of the Heart, Spencer, There Must Be A Pony, Apprentice to Murder, April Morning, True Blood, the 1989 Oscar broadcast, and Highway to Hell. This last movie was released in the early 90s, but according to IMDb it was filmed in 1989. The watermarks are a necessary evil.

The 90s

Chad Lowe joined the cast of Life Goes On (1989-93) during the 3rd season as a love interest for teenage daughter Becca (Kellie Martin). I watched the series off and on during its four seasons, busy those years with moving to San Francisco and doing photography for a local band. I didn’t see all of Chad Lowe’s episodes when they first aired, but the ones I did see made a lasting impression. He played Jesse McKenna, a teen whose hook up with a college girl at a frat party led to HIV. When he transferred to Becca’s school, he was cool, mysterious, tortured, and irresistible. Becca fell for him, then learned that they could never truly be together. Their relationship struggle was interwoven with Jesse’s fight for survival and acceptance. The series didn’t shy away from the physical and emotional effects of AIDS. It was bravely depicted, beautifully written, and devastating to watch. Chad Lowe gave one of the best performances of his career. He was recognized for it with a well-deserved Emmy. I spent a recent weekend binge-watching all the Jesse/Becca episodes, transferred from old degraded video tapes. I was emotionally drained by the end. It’s a sin these two seasons are not available on DVD or streaming, apparently because of legal issues over the music used in the soundtrack.

1990-1999

The roles above are: Nobody’s Perfect, Life Goes On, Candles in the Dark, Snowy River: The McGregor Saga, Floating, In The Presence of Mine Enemies, Quiet Days in Hollywood, The Hunger, Melrose Place, Touched by an Angel, ER, and Popular.

2000-2005

Chad Lowe played a lot of dark characters during the next decade of his career. I was grateful to have Take Me Home: The John Denver Story to lighten my mood while assembling this set.

2000-2005

The roles above: Now and Again, Take Me Home: The John Denver Story, Acceptable Risk, Law & Order: SVU, Unfaithful, Hack, CSI Miami, Without a Trace, Medium, and Fielder’s Choice.

2007-2016

Finally, arriving at the present!

2007-2016

The roles above: 24, Bones, Ghost Whisperer, Drop Dead Diva, Pretty Little Liars, California Scheming, Entourage, Rizzoli and Isles, and finally, Comedy Central’s Roast of Rob Lowe.

So, happy birthday to Chad Lowe, with my thanks for all the years of entertainment (and good cries). I hope there are many more to come!

I also hope fellow fans will leave a comment below—be sure to share your favorite role!

Chad Lowe as Spencer (1985)

Spencer pilot (1985)

Notes

A special thanks to my friend Amy for sharing the hard-to-find movies with me.

There are quite a few roles not shown here, but every year with an acting credit on Chad Lowe’s IMDb page is represented. I only used my sharpest images. YouTube has Dare To Love, Fighting for My Daughter, and Captive (at the moment) but they’re in poor shape. Several titles that I own are the same (example below); I had to use publicity shots for Life Goes On and Silence of the Heart. Some movies didn’t arrive in time to use here. Some I just couldn’t locate. The hardest-to-find category include these: the after-school specials, Red Betsy, So Proudly We Hail, Siringo, The Others, Target Earth, Driven, and Suicide the Comedy. I’m listing them here in case other Lowe fans can help me locate them.

As Kippie Petworth (such a great name!) in An Inconvenient Woman (1991)

I’ve focused here on his acting, but Lowe is also a director. I’m looking forward to seeing more of his work behind the camera.

Life in Pieces episode

Life in Pieces episode “Musical Motel Property Bingo” with guest star Andy Richter

The credits on IMDb overall seem pretty accurate, although he’s not in some of the season three episodes listed for Life Goes On.

I have to give a bemused shout-out to the girl at Lowe’s Wikipedia page who, despite various efforts to correct her, keeps “fixing” his TV credits.  All but two of them are so wrong they’re inspired. The edit history reveals that they’ve been far worse. I saved the December version:

Chad Lowe's wacky TV Credits from Wikipedia (circa December 2016)

Chad Lowe’s inaccurate TV Credits on Wikipedia (from December 2016). Only the first and last credits are correct.

My Big Hollywood Career

When I first began this blog, I wrote about being an extra for a location shoot here in San Francisco. It was for the TV series Party of Five. I was in London when “my” episode was broadcast, and the later seasons of the series have not yet been released on DVD. It’s taken fifteen years, but today I finally got to see my big moment onscreen. It’s season four, episode 6: Immediate Family, which aired on October 29, 1997. I walked behind Julia (Neve Campbell) and Griffin (Jeremy London) as they strolled through Alamo Square. Here’s the scene, followed by a slow motion clip of my walk through. I only know it’s me because of the hat I was wearing. Such exciting stuff!

Here’s the photo I took of my friend and Jeremy London at the Legion of Honor the day before, where we watched another scene being filmed. That night in Alamo Square, once we were done filming, we got London to autograph her copy of the photo. We didn’t want to bother him too much, so mine isn’t signed.

Jeremy London, 1997

So, my Hollywood career ended almost as soon as it began, with a couple of seconds of actual screen time in a dimly lit park on a chilly San Francisco night.  It was fun while it lasted.

San Francisco Halloween 2012

Every year, I take my camera to the Halloween block party off Central Avenue on Grove.  This year, I got there before the light left and the rain began.  What a great bunch of kiddies and doggies this year!  My thanks to the parents and dog owners who do such a great job with the costumes.

(Click on any photo to scroll through larger versions.)

An Argo/Tout Sweet Birthday

Today is my birthday, and I celebrated by going to see Argo with a friend.  Sometimes the movies that have a lot of Oscar buzz leave me cold.  I recognize their excellence but I feel disconnected, without an emotional involvement in the characters and story.  Not the case with Argo.  I was totally engrossed from the beginning, which gives a brief but helpful overview to the events leading up to the Iran hostage crisis.  I was a junior in high school when it began, and while I was aware of the overall situation during those years, I was also busy living my teenage life.  The movie made me realize how little attention I’ve paid to the major historical events in my lifetime.  Anyway, I recommend Argo, even though the hair and fashions will make you cringe.  Believe me, I was cringing then, too.

After the movie, my friend and I headed to Tout Sweet Patisserie, Yigit Pura’s new dessert shop in Union Square.  It’s a lovely space, with a delightful staff and a great view of the Square.  I had the Petit Tout Sweet cake and my friend had the sous-vide poached egg sandwich.  I met Yigit Pura a couple of years ago at the GLAAD Media Awards, and again last October at the Meals on Wheels calendar signing at Macys.  I’ve been following the progress of Tout Sweet through facebook and twitter, and today was the perfect day to visit.  Yum!

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